Posts Tagged ‘hollywood’

I am Max

March 22, 2017

I am Max

Director: Edward Porembny

Producers: Steven Fischer, Edward Porembny, Daniel Markowicz, Olivier Gal

Fiscal Sponsor: The International Documentary Association, Los Angeles.

Charlie Chaplin was his apprentice, he was the first international star, earning fortune and being adored in France, Europe and Hollywood. And then at the peak of his career everything suddenly finished. Max Linder ended his life by the side of his adorable wife. How was it possible?

Visit I am Max on IMDb

Old School New School on Film Monthly

February 8, 2017

Old School New School review at filmmonthly.com

herman-leonard-diane-davison-steven-fischer-at-opening-of-jazz-at-lincoln-center-nyc-oct-2009_photo-by-rick-edwards

Photographer Herman Leonard, attorney Diane Davison, film director Steven Fischer at opening of Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York City, October 2009. Photo by Rick Edwards.

steven_fischer_kathleen_monroe_Baltimore_Maryland

Director Steven Fischer with his cousin, Kathleen Monroe, Baltimore, Maryland.

Old School, New School

by Caress Thirus

We open on a common scene – a slightly flustered journalist making small talk with his interviewee as he prepares to ask his questions. Old School, New School is a documentary that follows Steven Fischer as he explores the different paths people take to develop their creative fingerprint, aka, their “voice”. A lot of people forget that documentaries are still films. Though they are informational, they’re meant for entertainment. There’s a sense of practical humor to this entire film, and key aspects are held from the audience so as to keep their interest. The first two minutes are sure to stir up a swirl of questions that Fisher and its interviewees answer during the film. “What is your voice, and how do you find it?” It’s a common question that anyone in an art-related career has asked themselves, time and time again. Though commonly asked, the answer is never straightforward. For some, the answer is simple; for others, not so much. This documentary compares and contrasts the answers given by different people in different careers, from dancers to cinematographers to musicians. The film is opinionated, but full of good opinions that are supported with logical reasoning. This is a film about voice, after all. How inappropriate would it be not to have an opinion or two? The entire documentary has a very honest feel to it; it’s realistic rather than rigged. Unfortunately, this causes it to drag in areas, but it always seems to pick back up. This movie is definitely in need of a soundtrack (and perhaps a more relevant title). It’s basic; there’s nothing unusual, and with all of the artistic people who were interviewed, it is upsetting to learn that none of their work is showcased in the film. Old School, New School sort of feels as if the filmmaker didn’t want to cut any of his interviews, and he left too many [unnecessary] clips in the film, making it too long. Still, the film feels organized and planned enough for the audience to keep watching. The viewer feels as if he or she is actually in the room with Fisher and the various people he interviews. It’s easy to get pulled into the stories they tell. In the end, the infamous question still stands. How does one go about defining their personal voice? Perhaps musician McCoy Tyner put it most simply when he said, “You found something you liked to do. It’s a matter of developing by doing it.”

Most information is derived from IMDB’s daily news, the Chicago dailies (Tribune and Sun Times), Entertainment Weekly, MSN.com, various sources as listed, and by just paying attention.

Caress Thirus is a student at Roosevelt University and a film enthusiast.

E-mail us at filmmonthly@gmail.com

Freedom Dance at The Embassy of Hungary

October 13, 2016

A very special thank you to Ambassador Reka Szemerkenyi, Cultural Attache David Singer and everyone at The Embassy of Hungary in Washington, DC, for including Freedom Dance in the Embassy’s 60th Anniversary Commemoration of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

For those who don’t know, Freedom Dance is an animated documentary that retells the adventure of a young couple, Edward and Judy Hilbert, escaping Hungary during the ’56 Revolution. Along the way, Edward kept a journal in cartoon form detailing their dramatic journey (which includes being robbed and nearly killed). The movie features Golden Globe winner Mariska Hargitay and is produced by Steven Fischer and Craig Herron.

Order your copy of DVD click here: http://www.freedomdancethemovie.com

 

ambassador-reka-szemerkenyi_steven-fischer_october-2016

Ambassador Reka Szemerkenyi and film director Steven Fischer at The Embassy of Hungary, Washington, DC, October 2016.

david_singer_steven_fischer_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956

Cultural Attache Singer David and film director Steven Fischer at The Embassy of Hungary, Washington, DC, October 2016.

steven_fischer_david_singer_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956_2

Director Steven Fischer speaks at the Festival of Film & Culture celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight. (Hosted by the Embassy of Hungary in Washington, DC.) October 12, 2016

steven_fischer_david_singer_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956

Director Steven Fischer (left) and Cultural Attache Singer David (right) speak at the Festival of Film & Culture celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight. (Hosted by the Embassy of Hungary in Washington, DC.) October 12, 2016

diane_davison_steven_fischer_gregg_landry_craig_herron_barbara_herron_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956-jpg

Some of the Freedom Dance team. L-R: Diane Leigh Davison, Steven Fischer, Gregg Landry, Craig Herron, Barbara Herron

steven_fischer_david_singer_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956_3  steven_fischer_david_singer_embassy_of_hungary_freedom_dance_october_2016_1956_washington-dc-3

 

Honoring 5-Time Academy Award nominated cinematographer William Fraker

May 29, 2015

May 31, 2015 marks five years since the passing of cinematographer William Fraker. In his prolific Hollywood career he built a solid reputation as one of the great cameramen. His credits include Bullitt, Rosemary’s Baby, WarGames, Heaven Can Wait, 1941 and Tombstone among so many others.

One of the earliest movies I ever saw in theaters was The Legend of The Lone Ranger (1981) which Mr. Fraker directed and in which Jason Robards delivers a terrific portrayal of President U.S. Grant. The movie had a profound impact on this 8-year-old. It awakened in me a fascination with the late 19th Century American West, a subject I still hold close to heart today and receive great pleasure studying.

I had the honor and joy of knowing and working with Mr. Fraker in 2008 while making Old School New School. One day I found myself in Mr. Fraker’s Hollywood home just down the street from Paramount Pictures. My friend Lisa Muldowney, a cracker jack PR agent, had introduced us months before. Mr. Fraker was full of excitement at recently discovering some rare photos (never published, he said) documenting the then-unique rigging used to mount cameras on the cars for the famous chase scene in Bullitt. He spread the photos over the dining room table. I studied each one as Mr. Fraker reminisced about the production. The movie released in 1968, yet all those years later he still talked about capturing that legendary chase scene with a radiant glow about him, an infectious childlike enthusiasm.

And it was at that table I had the chance (and the privilege) to thank him for his version of The Lone Ranger, and tell him about the impact it had on my life.

Thanks again, Mr. Fraker. We may have only known one another a short time, but your openness and graciousness will be with me for years to come.

Click to hear William Fraker’s words of wisdom about risk taking and success in the arts.

Steven Fischer with William Fraker shooting on location in Hollywood in 2008.

Steven Fischer with William Fraker shooting on location in Hollywood in 2008.

Steven Fischer Awarded Fulbright Honor

October 24, 2013

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs recently recommended two-time Emmy® nominated filmmaker Steven Fischer for the Fulbright Specialist Roster. Read more.

Watch Old School New School, Steven’s personal study on creativity with actor Brian Cox, jazz great McCoyTyner and many more world-class artists.

Old School New School Hits

July 6, 2013

Snag Films‘ First Quarter reports for 2013 are in: Old School New School received over 76,000 hits! A big THANK YOU to all of the movie’s supporters. We are so excited that people continue watching this study on creativity. Please share the SnagFilms link so others can share in learning how we can all tap into our full creative potential.

Just visit http://www.snagfilms.com, sign up, and start watching free of charge!

Thanks again for all your support and interest. It means the world to us.

Old School New School screening at Chapman University

November 19, 2012

On Monday, Nov 12, Old School New School screened at Chapman University in Orange, California. The post screening Q&A with director Steven Fischer was led by producer Michael Phillips. Click here to hear a moment from the evening in which Fischer talks about where creativity and ideas come from.

John Cleese on Creativity

September 23, 2012

Click here to watch an insightful, inspiring speech from John Cleese at Video Arts on Creativity. He reminds us of the value space, time, confidence, and humor have in our ability to tap into our full creative potential. Some of the ideas are present in Old School New School.

Creativity at Acorn Theater

April 26, 2012

Join us Saturday, April 28, 2012 at the Acorn Theater in Three Oaks, Michigan for a stimulating discussion on creative self development.

Details and registration

Location: Acorn Theater, 107 Generations Drive, Three Oaks, MI 49128

Date: Sat, Apr 28, 2012
Time: 1pm-3pm
Price: $15.00

Panelists:
Allen Turner, Chairman of the board of Columbia College Chicago’s Board of Trustees
Barbara Allen, Emmy Award winning producer, “DuSable to Obama”.
Corky Siegel, musician: Siegel-Schwall Band and the Chamber Blues group
Rick Kogan, creator/host, “The Sunday Papers with Rick Kogan” (WGN Radio)
Kim Clark, Emmy nominated producer; Artistic Director, Acorn Theatre

Moderator:
Steven Fischer, two-time Emmy nominated producer of Old School New School with Brian Cox.

“Death: A Perspective on Life” coming April 5, 2012

March 24, 2012

On Thursday, April 5 at 6pm we will be having an interactive panel discussion at the Chicago Cultural Center about mortality and creativity.

“In my beginning is my end. In my end is my beginning.” These two poetic statements, which frame one of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, capture the spirit of this panel discussion about the ways in which awareness of our own mortality impacts our life’s meaning, our creativity, and our resilience to adversity.

The Panelists:
Leah Roth-Howe is a descendant of Holocaust survivors. She draws on her family’s legacy to better understand the causes of genocide and uses the arts as a means of healing. In 2008, Leah led educational and art workshops in Cambodia for Khmer Rouge genocide survivors and their family members.

Omer Mozaffar was born in Karachi, Pakistan and is a lifelong member of the Chicago Muslim Community. He teaches Islamic studies at University of Chicago (Graham School), Loyola University, and Islamic centers throughout the city.

Dr. Todd DuBose has 25 years of experience in various modes of caring for others in tragic and/or “boundary” situations – from trauma chaplaincy and pastoral care to the arts of clinical psychology, focusing his work on the interplay between suffering, meaning, and care, and the inherent spirituality within this process. Dr. DuBose is an Associate Professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology and a licensed existential-phenomenological psychologist.

The Moderator:
Steven Fischer, who will facilitate the discussion, is a two-time Emmy® nominated writer/producer known for films that explore the human condition. His latest documentary, Old School New School, examines the nature of creativity with actor Brian Cox.

Hours: 6pm – 7.30pm

Location:
Chicago Cultural Center
78 E. Washington Street, 5th Floor Washington Room
Chicago, IL 60602

Admission: FREE!

This event is a part of the lecture series Starting from Scratch: The Psychology of Beginning, sponsored by The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Morbid Curiosity showcases collector Richard Harris’s nearly 1,000 works, including creations by many of the greatest artists of our time, which explore the iconography of death and human mortality. This exhibition of art, artifacts, installations, and decorative objects reflects the breadth of artistic expression on this topic across a variety of cultural and spiritual traditions and through almost six centuries.

For more details visit: Chicago Cultural Center